FAQ

Do you have any questions you would like added to our frequently asked questions page? If so, please email us atbrynmawrvet@gmail.com!

1. What could be toxic to my pet?
2. When should I bring my new puppy or kitten in for their first check up?
3. Why does my puppy/kitten need a fecal sample checked 3-4 times as a puppy then once a year after that?
4. Why should I spay/neuter my pet?
5. What is the best way to prevent flea and tick problems?
6. Why do I need to get my pet’s teeth cleaned, and how do I know if my pet’s teeth need cleaning?
7. What is a ResQ microchip and how does it work?
8. What are the benefits of having pre operative blood work and EKG on my pet prior to general anesthesia?
9. What can I do to help my overweight pet lose some pounds?

Staff ready to answer your pet questionsQ. What could be toxic to my pet?
A. Homes contain many potential hazards to pets. Many of the foods humans enjoy can be harmful to your pets. Some of the more common foods that are toxic to animals include chocolate, grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, avocado, alcohol, mushrooms, yeast, and even xylitol which is found in sugarless chewing gums and candies. You might not voluntarily give your animal any of these items, but pets can be good at getting into places they should not be, such as trash cans and purses. Even some foods which are not acutely “toxic” to pets can be harmful if not given in moderation. When pets eat more fatty foods than they are accustomed to, an inflammation of the pancreas can result. This is also known as “pancreatitis” and can be deadly.

In addition to food items, there are other potentially harmful items in homes, such as some plants, holiday gifts and decorations, insecticides and rodent baits, household chemicals and cleaners, and fertilizers. Medications, both for humans and animals, can also be dangerous. These include ibuprofen, acetaminophen, decongestants, cold medicines, and anti-depressants. Even medications prescribed for your pet can be harmful if they eat more than intended. This list is not all-inclusive, so if you have any particular questions, please contact your veterinarian or contact the ASPCA Poison Control Center, at 1-888-426-4435 (fee charged by ASPCA). A number and address for a local 24-hour emergency clinic should also be kept on hand in case of emergencies.

Q. When should I bring my new puppy or kitten in for their first check up?
A. We recommend your new pet come for the first visit within the first 72 hours of adoption to receive a full physical exam from a veterinarian.

Q. Why does my puppy/kitten need a fecal sample checked 3-4 times as a puppy then once a year after that?
A. Studies have show that 80% of puppies and kittens have intestinal parasites. We like to receive at least 3 negative stool samples in a row to make sure your pet is free of intestinal parasites. Generally, one fecal examination yearly after that helps ensure they have not picked up any parasites from their environment.

Q. Why should I spay/neuter my pet?
A. The biggest reason to spay or neuter your pet is to prevent unwanted pregnancies! Spaying and neutering your pet is also the safest and healthiest lifestyle for the non-breeding or show pet. Spaying your female pet reduces the risks of breast, uterine, and ovarian cancers. Neutering your male pets prevents testicular and prostate problems, as well as helps curtail the development of dominant and aggressive behaviors. See our surgical services for more information on spaying and neutering.

Veterinary Staff holding a puppyQ. What is the best way to prevent flea and tick problems?
A. For dogs, we recommend a topical flea and tick prevention -either Frontline or Advantix. These are pre-packaged oils that are applied between your dog’s shoulder blades once a month. If ticks are a concern in your area, you may need to consider using a tick collar as well as a topical prevention. For this, we recommend Preventix collars.

For cats, we recommend using a topical product as well – either Frontline or Advantage. As above, this is also applied between the shoulder blades once monthly.

See our medical services page for more information about fleas and ticks.

Q. Why do I need to get my pet’s teeth cleaned, and how do I know if my pet’s teeth need cleaning?
A. Dental disease is the most common disease process in companion animals. Your pet’s dental health can affect the rest of their body. Infection in their mouths from dental disease can affect the heart, liver, and kidneys. Dental disease causes oral pain and lack of appetite. The best way to know if your pet can benefit from dental cleaning is to have them examined by a veterinarian.

Q. What is a ResQ microchip and how does it work?
A. A ResQ microchip is a small chip about the size of a grain of rice, which is placed under your pet’s skin, between the shoulder blades. In the event that your pet is lost and taken to a veterinary hospital, animal shelter, or picked up by police, they will be scanned for a microchip. Your pet’s specific microchip number is linked to you and your contact information. This ensures that your contact information is with your animal, even if they should lose their collar. This permanent and safe form of identification is perfect for outdoor cats or dogs that may jump or even dig a hole under a fence!

Q. What are the benefits of having pre operative blood work and EKG on my pet prior to general anesthesia?
A. Pre-operative blood work and EKGs offer the veterinarian insight into your pet’s general health prior to anesthesia. Blood work includes a blood chemistry, complete blood count, and electrolytes. These give a good idea of liver and kidney function as well as abnormalities if there are any underlying infections. The EKG is sent to a cardiologist before surgery, who will tell us if there are any abnormalities, and if so, what the next step should be to insure the safety of your pet. Whether that is to use a different anesthetic protocol, take a radiograph of the heart, or even the recommendation of an echocardiogram prior to anesthesia.

Q. What can I do to help my overweight pet lose some pounds?
A. Exercise and diet are the first steps to help any overweight pet shed those extra pounds. We offer a wide variety of prescription diets that are low in calorie, to start. Exercise for a cat can be tricky, and we have found that laser pointers are a great tool to get your cat up and moving! For dogs, extra walks and trips to the dog park are great. Sometimes exercise and diets are not enough for dogs, and we can provide a product to give that final push. Slentrol is an oral medication given to dogs only to help get the weight off. Please ask one of our team members for additional information.